About
Moshe Lahav sings and plays with the enthusiasm of one who is truly in love with Israeli song and is determined to share that love with all around him.

With directness and simplicity, a strong and slightly weathered voice, and smoothly flowing but surprising medleys, Moshe Lahav performs his one-man show—The Big Tish, Israeli Songs and Inspiration. Without the diversion of song books or slides, his eyes meet those of everyone present, forming a giant but close-knit hevruta.

Lahav’s magnetic appeal is coupled with his outstanding familiarity with melodies and lyrics from the main streets and tiniest alleyways of Hebrew song. His enormous on-stage charisma is so unexplainably moving that audiences return to The Big Tish in an attempt to understand how an evening that begins with two or three quiet songs becomes a whirlwind of enthusiasm that carries over until the early morning hours and still leaves the crowd wanting more.

The Big Tish is as much the audience’s performance as Lahav’s, and together they create a unique musical and emotional experience. Like a rabbi holding sway over his congregation, Lahav conducts the Tish and his “followers” respond, lovingly and enthusiastically. Some of them—city dwellers and kibbutz and moshav members, the religious and secular, young and old—have been tracking Lahav’s performances for years and attending every one. Every Tish brings new participants, new sounds, new joys. The atmosphere is so engaging that anyone with a melody burning inside can jump up to the stage, grab a microphone, and break into song. And it no one cares if he hits a few wrong notes.

This is a truly extraordinary phenomenon that defies any rational explanation: Moshe Lahav, in a white shirt, guitar in hand, a certain roughness in his voice, stands on stage and mesmerizes the crowd of young and not-so-young listeners—religious and non, big city and small village folk. They’re all singing along with him, from their hearts and their guts.

The Big Tish: Israeli Songs and Inspiration is a one-man performance like no other. By breathing new life and spirit into Israeli songs of every type and origin, Moshe Lahav turns an evening’s entertainment into an unforgettable experience.

All who come for the first time are hooked. They seek out every opportunity to be swept up in the emotional fervor of his singing.

They come to sing together, carried along not with song books or slides but by the captivating charisma of Moshe Lahav.

Moshe Lahav sings and plays with the enthusiasm of one who is truly in love with Israeli song and is determined to share that love with all around him.



Outstanding Reviews for Moshe Lahav and the Big Tish


Eyal Marcus, Yedioth Ahronoth: A tish is a gathering of Hassidim around their rabbi, and that is certainly an apt description. The enthusiasm leaves no choice but to pound on the table or wave a hand in the air.”

Yossi Hersonski, Maariv: …and suddenly something happens: Everyone, I mean everyone, breaks into song. No song books, no slides, no instructions. They sing with their throats and souls, get up from the table, pat each other on the back, and climb to the stage to sing a solo or duet, their faces gleaming with joy.

Nira Russo, Yedioth Ahronoth: What’s the difference between a Tish and those sweaty sing-along clubs that are all over Israel? The difference is Moshe Lahav himself: a fantastic performer with the style of a French chansonier and enormous respect for diction and lyrics…Every song he chooses for himself and his guitar is given new meaning. It’s polished, not catered to.

Tsahi Cohen, Yedioth Ahronoth: Lahav’s performance reveals a few personality traits that are rare in showbiz: modesty, minuteness…no mannerisms.

Riki Rath, Makor Rishon: Lahav…is the king of the new Hebrew song. He is in absolute control of every word of the Hebrew and has entered a relationship with a growing number of loyal fans who share his love for Hebrew song…There’s room for everyone at The Tish, and that’s what’s so beautiful about it. The audience at Tmuna was drunk with love for the Hebrew singer.

Hadas Bashan, P’nai Plus: The songs that Lahav offers are among the most delightful in Israeli history…It’s wonderful, occasionally other-worldly and funny…

Varda Horowitz, LaIsha: This isn’t a performance, it’s a phenomenon. The evening begins with quiet songs, and then, like a bolt of lightning, the air is electrified. There’s no “Yallah!” and no “Applause!” There are no mannerisms, just ecstasy.

Boaz Arad, Yedioth Ahronoth:
Hebrew song junkies and addicts stream in the direction of Lahav’s guitar like mice in a stupor, and they do a fine job with the most esoteric of songs…For many years, Lahav and his Tish were the best-kept secret in Jerusalem. The hardcore of the hardcore.

Noam Gilor, Reshet Gimmel:
A performance that’s become a phenomenon in Israeli music…The trend that is sweeping everyone up.

Hadara Levin-Aradi, Jerusalem: The Big Tish is a unique social event, an evening’s experience that draws a variety of types from all over the country to enjoy the singing, the alcohol, and the spiritual elation.

Avner Ron, HaKibbutz: That is the charm of the performance—it belongs to everyone. Moshe directs matters, paves the way, and the audience follows him enthusiastically… His winning personality and ability to adapt himself to different audiences are the keys to his success.

Maariv NRG: Come, first and foremost, to sing. You’re allowed to sing off key, and even forget some of the words.

Michal Geller, Time Out: First, it’s not a sing-along like most of us are familiar with, and not only because there are no songbooks or slides. It’s mainly due to the way he handles the evening. I participated like a big girl, sang my lungs out…I jumped and danced without restraint.

Lili Avodi, Tsomet HaSharon: An evening full of energetic Hebrew song.

Dudu Zakai, Radio Kol Reka:
On ongoing Hebrew songfest.